Hierarchy of the HOME; Beyond the Tangible

As an interior designer I not only work to understand buildings, finishes, and furnishings but I am also curious about the nuances of human behavior and emotions. I would define interior design as designing spaces for people to use rather than for the interior spaces themselves. Interiors are not stand alone objects to simply exist. They are meant to be experienced, interacted with, loved, and enjoyed. On a fundamental level, we have all experienced the same interior type, the HOME. However what makes up that home type will be completely different for everyone, as every person on this planet has a home base in which they locate themselves every day. But what exactly makes it feel like a home?

A developmental psychology paper published in 1943 by Abraham Maslow, presented an idea that all humans have needs categorized in five different levels and that there’s a distinct hierarchy to them. His belief was that as humans go about their lives, they transcend the five tiered pyramid as they achieve each level. He outlined those levels as physiological at the base, then safety, love and belonging, esteem, and finishing with self-actualization at the top. But how does that relate to the feeling of home? At the rudimentary level, the concept of a home can be simply be defined as a semi permanent structure to protect the occupant from the elements and danger. A structure could be defined as a traditional house, apartment, or condo. The non traditional can include a boat, tiny house, tent, RV, or any other manufactured structure the occupant designs for elemental protection and shelter. This is the foundation level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

At the next more complex level, home can be defined as a specific place where someone lives and all of the stuff that’s inside it; the furniture, the decor, and the accumulated personal items such as clothes or books. Maybe there’s a pet or two, maybe the person lives with other people or has a family, maybe they work from home so it also acts as a place of employment. This covers the middle section of Maslow’s pyramid. Covering needs such as love, belonging, esteem, cognitive needs and aesthetic desires, the home becomes richly layered with decor, trip souvenirs, sentimental tokens from loved ones, books, plants, coordinated furniture, and personalized touches such as colorful paint or pattern wallpaper. Large rooms for entertaining family and friends become a priority, comfortable guest rooms and pretty front hall powder rooms are desired. Home offices are needed to focus on work, and the latest aesthetic trends in decor are introduced. These are all beautiful ideas and items, however what happens when the home interior moves beyond the tangible?

Photo by Visually Us on Pexels.com

At the top of Maslow’s pyramid is transcendence and self actualization. Prioritization of accumulating items and creating a coordinated interior changes as the occupants shift their beliefs to the intangible. Dreams of simple stress-free living, minimalist lifestyles, scaling back decor, reducing one’s carbon footprint and going off grid blossom at this top tier. It can even be as basic as downsizing the size of the home as one prepares to age in place by moving out of their larger empty nest. People at this level know their style, whether its colorful and quirky or monochromatic modern to coastal grandma and are striving for a home that’s calm, tranquil and nourishes the soul.

The application of Maslow’s needs hierarchy theory to interiors and the concept of home creates questions to ask yourself next time you are shopping for new home decor or pondering a renovation project. When gathering items for your home, pause a moment and ask yourself what is it providing for you physically, socially, emotionally, or financially. Will it serve your best interest long term or simply meet an immediate feeling or need? Do you need it or do you just want it? But, most importantly…contemplate about why and maybe work on that deeper issue instead.

Thanks for reading, please join me again next time. Check out my new “All Things Interior Design” podcast, available on all podcast platforms, as I delve into my blog archives.

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner and Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio – Millis, MA

COVID Butterflies

I’ve started and stopped this blog several times over the last year trying to summarize the COVID experience, now I’m determined to finish it.  The year 2020 was a wild one for sure, but now in the spring of 2021 we seem to be hopefully in the process of a metamorphosis. During this time we’ve been bombarded with COVID-19 news daily, flooded with new illness numbers and statistics.  The uncertainty of what was to come and the strong desire for life to return to normal now wafts through the air. The phrase “we’re all in this together” was being used constantly, yet many of us felt all alone, as the weight and severity of our individual situations sat heavily on each of our shoulders, seeming at times impossible to carry any longer…but we kept going.  In the beginning of the quarantine lock down, we cut our own hair, made our own masks and grew our own food.  To boost morale, we sang together on balconies and played musical instruments across rooftops.  While humankind hunkered down indoors, the outside world prospered and healed.  Wildlife ventured down main streets in metropolitan areas and blue skies were seen for the first time in a generation in the world’s most polluted cities.   

Whether it was work life being disrupted, loss of jobs, businesses being forced to close, unemployment claims, home schooling, zoom calls, remote learning, curb side pickups, and food delivery, we all learned a new way to keep going.  If you were holding a video call and the cat jumped on the table, you kept going all the while monitoring your child’s next zoom class starting time and when your groceries were getting delivered.  Grabbing a mask on the way out the door with your keys and cell phone is now standard procedure.  We wash our hands like surgeons and we socially distance ourselves.  We now have working from home as the norm, curbside pickups are available for every retailer and restaurants now all deliver.  Waiting in your car for appointments is the new procedure, you get a text when its your turn no matter whether its to the doctor or the barber.  We should be proud of ourselves, we kept going, we figured it out, we made it through and we’ve changed for the better, almost like a metamorphosis.

With the help of politicians and scientists coming together vaccine distribution programs have been developed, neighbors are helping neighbors find appointment slots, towns are rallying to support local businesses to fully open back up.  We are in the process of becoming something different, something better. 

“Sometimes during the harshest conditions, the most beautiful transformations can occur, an evolution out of necessity.”  

Think of what a caterpillar has to go through to get its wings to become a butterfly.  It has to completely isolate in a cocoon, much like COVID quarantine, then after a lengthy transformation process it has changed into a beautiful creature with wings of freedom.  Hopefully, with the vaccines development, we now have our wings of freedom.  Even if we’re not fully ready to fly yet, we have developed new methods to cope, to change, to evolve, to continue with life in a new way.  We’ve reinvented ourselves, learned new skills and hobbies, developed new ways to work and operate.  We’ve shared scientific knowledge and pooled resources to others.  We’ve grown wings without even knowing it, we’re butterflies now and we’re beautiful!

Thanks for reading, please join me again next time. Check out my new “All Things Interior Design” podcast, available on all podcast platforms.

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

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Minimalism and Being Tidy

The summer is over and schools are back in session.  The temperature is dropping and the trees are beginning to change colors and shed their leaves.  Trees do this to conserve energy.  As we move into autumn, its time to follow the trees preservation method and conserve our own energy by shedding our own leaves.  For this blog post, I write once again on the topic of minimalism in its effects on every day life.  Specifically, how to reduce items and naturally influence the knack for being tidy, thus conserving your energy for the truly important things in life.

If you’re constantly frustrated with the mess in your house, the stress that wanting to tidy up all the time causes you, or maybe overwhelmed with needing to sort and purge, then lets figure out some ways to help you shed and conserve all of that stressful energy.  I’m by no means a trending lifestyle guru, I’m just in a routine that I find beneficial, inspired by the ideals of minimalism philosophies.  With these practices I don’t have a lot of the clutter items that often bog down many people.

Things I don’t have:
  • Piles of junk mail
  • Unused items such as clothes, shoes, kitchen tools, or linens
  • Items in storage I might need one day
  • Anything expired
  • A junk drawer (inconceivable, I know!)
  • Broken or ripped anything
  • Cluttered surfaces
  • Useless or meaningless knickknacks

I simply don’t have them. They’ve either been processed and tossed out or donated. I have six methods of staying organized and tidy that I’ve adopted over the years that I can attribute to minimalism and find to be very beneficial. Its just like learning any new skill for your job, you must retrain yourself into a new behavior.  First, its very new but then after a while its routine and simply your modus operandi. My six methods can all tie into each other and are as follows:

Do it now
    How many times do you toss something aside and say to yourself that you’ll put it away later? Do it now while you remember.  It can also relate to chores, errands, just things to do in general. Do them now, while they’re on your mind. 
Touch it once
    This one particularly works for junk mail and paperwork. Don’t just bring it in and toss it on the counter, but rather sort it, file it, rip it and recycle it immediately.  Three letters in the mail is easy, an accrued stack of 50 pieces tall is overwhelming.  Bring in the mail and sort it immediately. 
Reset the scene
    This one pertains to rooms. When you’re finished with an activity, make the room ready for the next time use. For example, never leave dirty dishes in the kitchen at the end of the night, don’t leave out toiletries on the bathroom counter in the morning, or leave work on a Friday with a messy desk. When finished with something, clear it up and leave the area ready for next time. 
Once a season
    This one is good for clothes, coats, shoes, holiday decorations, and linens.  In the transition time between seasons, sort through previous used items and prepare for the new season coming by donating and tossing items that no longer work for you. 
Be realistic
    This one is in regard to all of the unused items you have stored away in your closets, attic, garage, and basement. It’s all the extra unused stuff that you’ve been given, inherited, or simply accumulated over the years. You need to be realistic on ever using these items. Sentiment and memories still exist without the items. Can the items better serve someone else? If so, then sell or donate them.  If they’re unusable or worthless, ask yourself why you have them. 
One in, One out
    This one relates to shopping. If you buy new shoes, toss out their predecessor pair.   Did you buy new towels, don’t leave the old ones in the cupboard, donate them to animal shelters.  Some people keep old towels in case of an emergency water leak.  If you’ve ever had a leak, you know you move fast and won’t be thinking, “Oh, grab the old blue towels not the new ones”  You grab whatever’s first visible to stop the flood.  Simply toss out the old used up items once you buy new ones.  This stops the  accumulation of useless stuff at the source.

Lastly, many people may comment that their spouse or children wouldn’t go along with these efforts.  If that’s the case then just focus on your items for which you’re responsible.  You’ll feel better and then, hopefully seeing your success, they’ll feel inspired to join you.

Its OK, step by step, you’ll get there.  Set small goals so not to create chaos, many people burn out by overdoing the attempt. Slowly, room by room it will happen. 

Set yourself free and shed your leaves.

fallen leaves

Thanks for reading, please join me again next time.

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

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Minimalism; back to basics.

I love minimalism, I believe the lifestyle philosophy is hugely beneficial for both mental clarity and lifestyle simplification.  Its a reoccurring theme in my blogs.  Last year I wrote about minimalism in a two part series Minimalism & Living Simply; Part 1 and Minimalism & Interiors; Part 2. The topic is also mentioned in many of my other posts including those about purging and downsizing, check out my blog archive for more.  In this blog, let me get back to basics, both in regards to minimalism in interior design and in a broader sense of life itself.

People have a preconceived notion about what a minimalist interior looks like.  Words used often have a negative connotation like barren and stark.  Case in point, the photo below:

loft, simple decor, minimalism, minimalist decor, interior designers in MA

Its a simple room with only the most basic furnishings.  Most likely this photo was staged this way to make an obvious point.  In reality, minimalist style doesn’t have to be so…well, minimal.  For me, I would furnish a room with all the necessary items and then stop when something has no purpose other than being idle decor.  Simple window shades, for example in the photo above, would not detract from the minimalist aesthetic.  Its all in the way that its done.  In reality, these windows would need covering for both weather and privacy.

For a minimalist decor approach, if it serves no purpose or meaning then it should not go into your home.  Its visual clutter, fills up a space, and eventually just needs dusting.  Visual clutter and chores create stress and prevent relaxation.  Minimalism goes beyond the aesthetic but rather its about life simplification.  So that minimal interior isn’t barren and stark, rather it should really be considered simplified and calming.

The purpose of minimalism is to return to the basics and focus on what’s important in life.  Simplification for the sake of getting more enjoyment from the space and being mindful of the actual activity.  Some people would say “oh, but its not cozy!” I’m all for a cozy space, bring on the Hygge factor.  The very definition of Hygge is cozy, its a Danish philosophy focusing on the people and activity but not all of the superfluous stuff.  And you know what else does that… minimalism.

In another post I can easily write about an aesthetically pleasing cozy atmosphere that’s filled to the hilt with stuff.  But to defend my point, all of that stuff had still better serve a purpose.  To all of those people who say “I can’t get rid of my things!”, I’m not asking you to, but just ask yourself this: is your life calm? Are you relaxed or stressed? Do you have a list of chores and always find yourself searching for something or having to tidy up the house?  Maybe you’re not ready to be a minimalist yet, but would it help to start being a “reductionist”?

Join me next time for another thought provoking design topic that hopefully helps bring you insight for your home, business, and life in general.

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

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Decor & Accessories; for a Purpose and Meaning

After a long hiatus, my blog has returned. Let’s jump right into the deep end…

If you take a look around any home store right now they are bursting with decor and accessories. Quite rightly so, the holidays are the quintessential time to decorate the home with accessories. Pretty as all of those glittery baubles are, they are majorly lacking in one area: purpose and meaning. Let me explain…

This time last year I wrote about holiday decorations and included a cute poem depicting the sentiment of decorations. If you missed it, here’s the link: Twinkle & Sparkle.  Now, I would be a hypocrite if I didn’t acknowledge that my home too is decorated with beautiful and curated store-bought decorations. I’ll even confess that I have a color coordinated Christmas tree that I put up with military tactical precision, calculating the distance between the same colors so as not saturate any area but rather evenly disperse the ornaments. (Seriously, I’m a real treat to decorate a Christmas tree with, its serious business. Occupational hazard, my apologies!)

But, with that precision, in the adjacent branches should be the ornaments that over time your family has created by gluing together popsicle sticks, knitting and crocheting bits of yarn, painting doilies, and drawing on tissue paper with markers.  Children’s art and family heirlooms are so precious and the most meaningful decorations you’ll ever have. In my mind at least, therefor the most beautiful, deserving the front row center spots on the tree.  Your tree will be forever the more humbly beautiful with them.

Another offender in the decor category besides pretty but meaningless holiday decor are the pointless accessories that stores sell to decorate your mantel, bookcase shelves, and coffee tables.  You know the type of things I’m talking about, its the abstract armillary globe with the arrow sticking out for your mantel shelf or the droid looking horse head bookends for your bookcase.  I think the worst one of all has to be the innocently placed, beautifully carved bowl on the coffee table but then is ruined with these five to seven “balls” sitting inside it.  They’re usually made of wicker or painted resin and they do absolutely nothing.  They sit in the bowl and just act as decor.  Really? We as a society have come to this, we can’t leave the bowl empty to stand alone and just be?  We have to fill it, don’t we? We’re uncomfortable unless there is something in the bowl.  I issue a challenge to all of you with a bowl with these fake balls in them, for the New Year…toss out the balls.

decor

What’s my point with this rambling rant?  When decorating your home with accessories, think about their meaning and purpose.  Are they a real item with history or are they simply shelf filler? Beautiful things are nice, but they should more importantly also hold a functional purpose or meaning to your heart.  A decorative bowl can just be a bowl, in all its glory, and sit empty.  Really, it will be OK, I promise you!

Have a great holiday season everyone, I’ll be back next year with fresh ideas and more satirical humor.

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

cottage, landscaping

Downsizing; finding the RIGHT fit

I’ve lived in 200 sf and I’ve lived in over 3,000 sf.  Both of these sizes provided everything I needed…at the time.  That’s the key, living in a space that provides you what you need at the time.  It’s simple and basic, but many people don’t do it.  Their house is either bursting at the seams with people and stuff or they are rolling around like marbles with empty rooms they no longer use.

If you’re fortunate enough to be able to choose the house among several, realize the home isn’t just the style or location but also fit. Knowing and really thinking about the stage of life you’re in currently and probably the next 5-10 years will allow you to choose correctly.  Budget is a separate issue altogether; what you should buy and what you can afford to buy can often be two very different numbers, therefore housing options.

downsizing, real estate, interior design

When people live in a space for a few years the phrase “I need more space” often starts creeping in.  It’s not that you need more space, you just need less stuff or better organization. (Check out my previous archived blogs under the minimalism category)

finished attic space, teen space

Houses now have man caves, living rooms, family rooms, play rooms, teen hangout rooms, bunk rooms, craft rooms, finished attics, rec rooms and finished basements. That’s a separate type of room that 50 years ago used to be all the same room.  Let that sink in for a minute…all the same room. Whoa, right?

Once settled in the +3,000 sf house, people feel like they’re always picking up, tidying, cleaning, and honestly- constantly walking around stuff.  Kitchens now have two islands and built in banquettes, breakfast bars that seat 6-8 plus a dining room to host 8-10 people. That’s a lot of places to sit and eat a piece of toast with your morning coffee. Also a lot of counters to clean and furniture to walk around.

kitremodel (11)

Have you ever cooked in a really small kitchen? It’s fun! You’re at the stove, turn around you’re at the sink. Need a knife? It’s in the drawer right next to you. Need something from the fridge? It’s beside you an arm’s reach away. While you’re stirring the pot, the spice rack and spoon rest are most likely beside you already.

So what’s my point? Just because your mortgage says you can afford the +2500 sf house doesn’t mean you should. Think about that cute craftsman you saw or that 2 bedroom town home, would they really work better? What would the added income, that you would save every month from your mortgage, do for you? Can it pay off a car loan, old student loans, zero your credit card, then bulk up your neglected retirement accounts or maybe start a nice juicy college fund for your kids? Just think about it…

reducing construction costs, how to save money during a renovation, construction expenses, construction help

Join me next time when I discuss decor and accessories with a purpose and meaning. Thanks for reading, have a great day!

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

Beyond Daylight; it’s all about Connectivity.

As I write this month’s blog, it’s cloudy and snowing. A perfect setting to discuss spreading daylight through the home.  Do you have a dark room or hallway and wonder how to get more light?  Many people have their lights on during the day when there’s no need.  With proper delivery of sunlight, lights would only be used in the dark, completely logical right?

A dark and dreary interior doesn’t have to be with using purposeful historic features that carry daylight through a building while also bringing architectural interest and connectivity.  One method is transom windows.  These windows occur above doors and help spread daylight through to the next room.  Sidelights are another method, often used on front doors.  Any pet owner will recognize the immediate benefit of having a sidelight next to their doors; to alert them their furry friend wants to come in.  Another method for delivering daylight throughout about space and is becoming more common is the interior window.  Simply put, it is a window that is placed on an interior wall between rooms.  Often used in a long horizontal orientation to ease sight lines to entrances, niche corners, or landmarks within a space such as a reception desk. When an interior window is placed in a wall that is adjacent to an exterior window, the daylight is pulled into that next room.  If privacy is an issue, have the window sill placed higher up from the floor.

dream catchers, windows, courtyards

windowsdoors

pantry doors, open floor plans, wood flooring

Beyond spreading daylight throughout the space, it’s also about connecting to the next space.  Transoms, sidelights, and interior windows help pull you through to the next room.  But it’s not just windows that can do this, decorative french doors on pantries, laundries, playrooms, basements, dens and even dressing rooms help connect you, draw you through to the view beyond, and expand the feeling of space.

Whether it’s with a window, a glazed door, or even a mirror, spread the daylight around, appreciate the view, and expand your perspective!  Make a physical connection and engage with what is right next to you, whether it’s a room, your garden, or your neighborhood.  It’s all about connectivity!

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Millis, MA

Resolutions & Decor Dreaming.  A Designer’s Bucket List of Dream Projects.

First, I need to apologize for missing last month’s blog “Stained Glass, Tales of Color” that was supposed to be published. You see, a week before Christmas, when my blog would have come out, I suffered a technological apocalypse.  My laptop experienced a quick and spontaneous demise.  It turned on once briefly giving me a glimmer of hope but alas it was just enough to quickly harvest files onto a jump drive and then it glowed no more. When I logged onto my blog to complete it for the month on another laptop, I realized it was completely unsaved and was truly lost. I will address the topic again at a later date as it’s already written in my mind, but right now with the help of a new laptop, it’s time for the next scheduled topic of resolutions and decor dreams.


As the hurried pace of the holidays slows and the decorations come down, the focus shifts to the new year before us.  Many people set resolutions; goals or dreams for themselves for the upcoming year.  Most designers have a secret list of project types they would love to do in their professional lifetime.  As a designer, I’ve taken that approach and created a bucket list of projects I aspire to be involved with at some point, may it be this year or in the future.

As an introduction on why these items are on my list, I like places that drip with ambiance.  To make a place memorable and enjoyable, they have to exude character and have a good vibe.  A restaurant for example, has to have a combination of good food and service, plus great atmosphere to bring repeat clients.  If you have one of these food or drink venue related projects, call me today! I would clear my schedule for you…

  1. Wine Bar
  2. Moroccan Restaurant
  3. French Bistro/Bakery
  4. English Pub/Old World Tavern
  5. Jazz Club

Now, here are some pretty pictures, let’s all dream together.

brick wall interior, cafe, renovated historic building, loft living

french bistro, french bakery, restaurant designers

ice cream parlor, cafe, vintage charm restaurants

french bakery, pastries, cafe design, restaurant design, chefs, french menus

cafe design, white wash brick wall, light fixtures, espresso bar design, interior designers in MA

jazz club, pub design, martini lounge, atmospheric establishments

My design resolutions aren’t all food related.  If you have one of these commercial or residential projects I will still excitedly clear my schedule for you…

  1. Modern Office
  2. Mid Century Modern House
  3. Studio Apartment
  4. Tiny House
  5. Restored Cottage
  6. Whimsical Preschool
  7. Surf Shack

officewhite

studio apartment, loft, mid century modern

tiny house living, tiny homes, cottages, downsizing, interior designers in MA

Happy New Year everyone and thanks for reading my blog!  Set your 2018 goals high and make them happen.  Whether you want to renovate, redecorate, or just rejuvenate, contact my studio, I’d be happy to help you.

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Medway, MA

Join next time: “Beyond Daylight; it’s all about Connectivity.”

 

minimalist interiors, simple interiors, gallery wall, interior designers in MA, black and white photography

Minimalism & Interiors; Part 2

Welcome Back!

This is part two of my ongoing series regarding minimalism and living simply.  This month I discuss minimalism and interiors.  As I mentioned in my previous month’s blog Minimalism & Living Simply:

“Any style of interior can be minimalist by simply not getting lost in the details and decor.”

Often times in the glossy decor magazines the rooms are filled to the hilt with accessories.  I’ve always felt that when designing an interior that the room needs space to breath and the eye needs a place to  rest.  This is where minimalism shines.

white kitchen, minimalist kitchens, kitchens without upper cabinets, minimalist interiors, interior designers in MA

Simple & Functional Kitchen

brown and white bedrooms, simple bedroom ideas, minimalist bedroom, interior designers in MA
Simple Bedroom

white office design, teal office, minimalist office decor, office interiors, interior designers in MA
Minimal & Modern Office Layout

tropical bedroom, teak wood, simple bedroom interiors, rustic resorts, hotel bedroom ideas, interior designers in MA
Rustic & Natural, Minimal Decoration

loft, simple decor, minimalism, minimalist decor, interior designers in MA
Urban & Simple Minimalist Apartment

See? All different styles of interiors, but they’re ALL minimalist in nature.

Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, father of modern architecture is credited with the famous design phrase “Less is more.” however after delving in further, I found the phrase, under the same context, first appeared in a line of “Andrea del Sarto, The Faultless Painter”, a poem by Robert Browning.  Regardless of who said it first, the statement remains the same.  Less IS more.

To reiterate my minimalist point even more, this month’s blog even mimics my mantra when approaching minimalism in interiors. Don’t get lost in the details.  If you are developing a minimalist approach to a room, I invite you to share it with me via my contact page.  I would love to see what my readers are doing or work with you on a project!


Next month we step away from minimalism and into the DIY world of kitchen renovations.  If you want your kitchen project finished in time for the Holiday season, you must start now.  You can do it, but let me help you.

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Medway, MA

Join in September: “10 steps to a budget friendly, DIY kitchen renovation.

 

minimalism, simple living, stress free living, serenity

Minimalism & Living Simply; Part 1

Introduction

This isn’t a one and done blog topic but rather an introduction to a new, more satisfying lifestyle for those seeking simplicity.  Are you downsizing or leaping excitedly into a tiny house or cottage?  Maybe your cluttered or full rooms make you feel overwhelmed, like they’re taking over?  Or, do you enjoy looking at bare counter tops, sleek furniture, and tidy rooms?  The beauty of minimalism and living simply is that you get to define it by how it makes sense for you and your lifestyle.  Most likely you know where you fall on the minimalist spectrum as it covers furniture design, home decor and design, fashion, lifestyle and personal processions.  Terms like simple, streamline, uncluttered, pure, serene, calm, bare, and essentials, will resonate with you and you’ll strive to enact these principles into your life.  Welcome and keep reading!

minimalism, living simply, serene

Question

I was asked recently how does someone live minimally when their spouse wants to hoard and keep everything?  This situation is a common frustration among couples.  Luckily, the solution is simple: start with your own stuff.  This will help relieve some of your burden and lighten your load.  Hopefully, along the way, your spouse will join you in your efforts.

Purge

In two of my previous blogs Making room in your rooms and Evolving rooms and flexible spaces.  I discuss how to clear out the clutter.  For those who are ready to start really simplifying its time to purge the surplus from your home or business.  Below is an outline of categories I’ve cultivated to reference when starting to reduce:

  1. Clothes, shoes, coats, & seasonal gear
  2. Bags & luggage
  3. Furniture & decor
  4. Bedding & linens
  5. Pans & baking dishes
  6. Pantry & refrigerator
  7. Tupperware & food storage
  8. Cleaning supplies
  9. Toiletries & medicine
  10. Office & desk
  11. Bills, mementos, & mail
  12. Books & media
  13. Electronics, gadgets, & small appliances
  14. Junk drawer & tool box
  15. Holiday decorations
  16. Toys & sporting goods
  17. Car & gardening supplies

Spend time clearing and reducing items from these categories until you only have your desired and used items.  Some categories may be very easy while others may require more time.  Once you’ve exhausted this list, you should feel emotionally and physically lighter.  Arrange a charity to pick up your items, sell them, or pass them along to someone you know, just free yourself. minimalism, living simply, meditation, stacking stones, serenity, calmness

Maintain

Now, its time to start putting in place some principles that maintain your newly found freedom.  What may seem like discipline will quickly come routine.  Additional resources are abundant on this topic.  Two that I am familiar with and follow are the Minimalists Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus and becoming minimalist  by Joshua Becker.  If you want to learn more in depth on the living minimally then these three gentlemen are a great go to resource.

A few principles that are constant throughout any minimalist reading deal with the accumulation of new things once you’ve purged the old.

  1. 1 in 1 out Rule. If you bring something into the home then an old thing needs to go.  Example, if you buy new shoes, then toss out the old ones.
  2. Stop Leisure Buying.  Going shopping at the local mall used to be a common Saturday activity.  People have accumulated a vast amount of clothes that they rarely or no longer wear.  The too tight designer jeans bought on clearance, the leather boots that make your feet hurt, the wet suit you bought for that one vacation,  and the wool ski sweaters that make you itch, its time for them all to go.  Now, with the help of online shopping, the impulse of casually browsing is reduced. Only shop when you need something.
  3. Getting Unusable Gifts.  Receiving a gift from a loved one is wonderful, if you can use it or want it.  However, if its not your style or useful to you, thank them, keep it for a while you’re comfortable with and then pass it along.
  4. Keeping Nostalgic Items.  This one is very difficult.  Some people want to keep everything because of its meaning.  Ask yourself “If I get rid of this item, did that event/person change?” You still have your memories, the situation still occurred.  Baby clothes for example, keep the “coming home” outfit and your favorite onesie and then pass along the rest.  Teens’ sport/activity t-shirts are another nostalgic category.  Memory quilts are popular options for sentimental clothes and then can be actively used again.  If you or someone you know doesn’t sew then there are companies online that will make the quilt for you, simply mail the clothes to them and six weeks later, your memory quilt is ready.  Children’s drawings and artwork is another tug at the heartstrings.  Every year, purge out the ones you and your child don’t really care for, take a photo of them and toss them.  Keep only the ones that you cherish and frame them or place them in a memento box.
  5. Saving for “One Day If…”  It makes financial sense for children’s clothes to be kept for younger siblings but if you’re hoarding things in the garage and your basement is bursting, its time to reevaluate.  “You might need that one day” is a slippery slope.  Use it today, plan for tomorrow, but never keep for what if.  Your house is a home to live in not a closet to store stuff.
  6. Traveling Light.  I’ve heard this from so many seasoned travelers, travel light.  Once you start this practice, you’ll never want to travel burdened with big suitcases again.  People who travel heavy need to have a lot of options and feel completely prepared for any situation and don’t make outfit decisions before they leave.  Check the weather for your trip, make outfit choices that mix and match and leave the rest at home.  If you have access to a sink or bathtub, then you can do laundry.  When I studied abroad for four months in college, I packed one week of warm weather clothes, one week’s worth of cold weather clothes, and travel sized toiletries to cover the first few days there.  All of my clothes layered with each other.  I had space in my luggage for my art supplies, souvenirs and items that I bought there during the four months.  For a regular vacation, a small 19″ carry-on and a backpack will work for you just fine, you’ll see.
  7. Capsule Wardrobe/Uniform.  Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs made wearing the same thing everyday trendy.  Their wardrobe of a gray tshirt and black turtle neck respectively, with jeans became their signature looks.  Who would dare comment to these two successful gents if they wore the same shirt yesterday?  They’re tech icons and they rock the “uniform” idea.  A capsule wardrobe (~30 items) is much easier for many people to get on board with and adopt.  I’ve even read about seasonal capsule wardrobes, however I feel that idea is stretching the concept beyond its intent.  The idea of a capsule wardrobe harks back to the 1900’s where people simply didn’t own a lot of clothes.  Instead, they owned only what they loved, choosing quality over quantity and maintained them. Don’t fear judgement as you embrace your freedom and lighter lifestyle.  A minimalist wardrobe will simply be another aspect to your lifestyle and extension of your beliefs. Your coworkers will see your tidy workstation and your friends will see your uncluttered home, then understand your capsule wardrobe as completely logical.
  8. Minimalism & Interiors.  I’ll continue this blog next month to cover minimalism and interiors in depth as many people have a preconceived notion that minimalism has to mean modern, not necessarily so.  Any style of interior can be minimalist by simply not getting lost in the details and decor.  Tune in next month for a more in depth discussion.

Remember that minimalism is a lifestyle, a practice, and a way of life that alters the way you see your possessions and environment.  Set them free and they will set you free.

Sincerely,

Sarah Daricilar, NCIDQ

Studio Owner & Interior Designer

Daricilar Design Studio    –    Medway, MA

Join in August: “Minimalism & Interiors